Re-establishment of the shrubby tororaro (Muehlenbeckia astonii Petrie), a nationally threatened plant
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Re-establishment of the shrubby tororaro (Muehlenbeckia astonii Petrie), a nationally threatened plant

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Published by Dept. of Conservation in Wellington, N.Z .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New Zealand.

Subjects:

  • Muehlenbeckia astonii -- New Zealand.,
  • Endangered plants -- New Zealand.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDavid A. Norton.
SeriesScience & research internal report,, 188, Science & research internal report (New Zealand. Dept. of Conservation) ;, no. 188.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK495.P78 N785 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination21 p. :
Number of Pages21
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3599411M
ISBN 100478220324
LC Control Number2002327164
OCLC/WorldCa49844090

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The proper name of this plant is not easy to spell – Muehlenbeckia astonii – but I have never even heard it referred to by its alleged common names of ‘shrubby tororaro’ or ‘wiggy-wig bush’. Not that common, apparently. The plantings in a prominent position at Auckland Botanic Gardens have . Shrubby tororaro (Muehlenbeckia astonii) makes its distinctive presence known throughout the country, particularly in coastal close, it is a striking specimen, most noticeably for its brilliant green, heart-shaped leaves and pinkish flowers which, in winter, reveal a tangle of . About Shrubby tororaro. With small bright green heart shaped leaves and with tangled zig-zagging branches this rare shrub makes an interesting contrast plant. Very hardy and tolerates dry conditions and wind, making it very hardy in coastal conditions. The twigs are orange with small flowers from spring until autumn, follwoed by a small edible.   Once abundant along the East Coast, shrubby tororaro is now down to plants, most of those on private farmland on Kaitorete Spit near Banks Peninsula. This story was first published by RNZ; Forest and Bird's Jen Miller said farmer Brent Thomas sprayed the shrubs with a herbicide before the land was sown with oats for winter feed.

It is also threatened by loss of its original habitat through disturbance, fragmentation and fire. Many of the shrubby tororaro that survive in the wild are single plants isolated from others of their species. Because male and female flowers occur on separate plants, these specimens have no opportunities to reproduce.   Environmentalists Forest & Bird claim footage taken with a drone shows vast areas of land at Kaitorete Spit that once was home to the endangered shrubby tororaro plant is now destroyed. “Often it’s a case of small impacts adding up to a major loss, but here a single incident has made it far more likely for a species to go extinct in the wild. Muehlenbeckia astonii / shrubby tororaro has heart -shaped leaves. Whaupaku/five -finger are like your hands. Horoeka/lancewood are like spiky swords with jagged edges. Kōwhai is the Māori word for yellow; its flowers appear in spring. CH Rimu stems have rough -feeling leaves along them. Tōtara are prickly, with shaggy bark. Shrubby definition is - consisting of or covered with shrubs. Recent Examples on the Web The report found that tiger populations had increased across India, with the highest number in Madhya Pradesh, a hot, shrubby state with more than cats. — Kai Schultz, , "India’s wild tiger population rises, despite conflict with humans," 29 July But the game animals Ledford.

The shrubby tororaro is a very ecologically and culturally significant shrub. Wetland forests There are three distinctive types of wetland forests - swamp forest, peatland forest, and intertidal forest. Related Forest habitats. Forests are rich habitats full of trees, and are .   Once abundant along the East Coast, shrubby tororaro is now down to plants, most of those on private farmland on Kaitorete Spit near Banks Peninsula. Forest and Bird's Jen Miller said farmer Brent Thomas sprayed the shrubs with a herbicide before the land was sown with oats for winter feed. About shrubs were lost. Forest & Bird says the vast majority of shrubby tororaro is found on one farm on Kaitorete Spit, a narrow stretch of land between Lake Ellesmere and the sea, and claim the farm's new owner sprayed. “While we’re relieved that the remaining shrubby tororaro will be safer, for the moment, this is really the best that could be made of a bad situation,” says Forest & Bird Chief Executive.